‘Richard III and the Princes in the Tower’ Talk by Matt Lewis – Jan 30th


(c) The History Press


At the end of January I watched Matt Lewis’s interesting talk about Richard III and the Princes in the Tower. The princes were the subject of Matt’s book, ‘The Survival of the Princes in the Tower’, which was published in 2017.


(c) Matt Lewis


Some of Matt’s main points were:

If Richard III had the Princes killed, it was to end the threat to his throne. But if the deaths were not publicised, nothing was gained.

Did the Duke of Buckingham plan to put himself on the throne? Henry Tudor only seen as a potential king after the Duke of Buckingham is executed. Did Buckingham want the Princes out of the way? Richard passes up the chance to put the blame on Buckingham.

If the Princes were not murdered, what would Richard do with them? They could have been looked after by Richard or possibly sent abroad.

If Richard had them in custody in 1483, he had 2 options.

1. King John and his nephew, Arthur of Brittany (son of his older brother, Geoffrey). John had Arthur arrested and it is widely believed that he had Arthur murdered.

2. Henry IV had the sons of Roger Mortimer taken into custody and they were eventually placed in the household of Henry, Prince of Wales.

The idea of the survival of the Princes in the Tower.

No proof that they survived but we don’t know what evidence was destroyed. We can hope to see the effect of their continued existence on those around them.

There is circumstantial evidence that one boy survived beyond Richard III’s death.

Elizabeth Woodville never accused Richard. Why would Elizabeth hand over her daughters otherwise?

Jack Leslau believed that Edward V survived as Edward Guildford. His daughter Jane, was able to inherit his goods when he had left no will. Jane married John Dudley who became the Duke of Northumberland.

Jane was described on her tomb as ‘right noble and excellent Princess.’ This could have been because she was the daughter of Edward V.

John Dudley masterminded the plot to put Lady Jane Grey on the throne. Jane Dudley insisted that her son, who had been married to Jane Grey, become King and not King consort. Was this because Guildford was the grandson of Edward V and it was a joining of the white rose to the Tudor.

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And the winners of Day 6 and Day 7 Giveaways are….


Day 6 – Zoe L



Day 7 – Jill A




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Too Close to Her Throne: The Other Cousins – Talk by Professor Susan Doran


Too Close to Her Throne: The Other Cousins
Professor Susan Doran
Online Event for the British Library
13th October
19.30-20.30


(c) British Library


‘Professor Sue Doran looks how other close female kin of Elizabeth I created problems for her as well as themselves.

This is an online only event hosted on the British Library platform. Bookers are sent a viewing link shortly before the event and are able to watch at any time for 48 hours after the start time.

The Tudors were good at producing daughters. During her lifetime, Elizabeth had nine female cousins on her father’s side. Three of them (including Lady Jane Grey) were dead before 1560, but six lived on to cause Elizabeth considerable problems during her reign.

Mary, Queen of Scots is the most famous and the subject of our exhibition. In this talk by Professor Sue Doran, the focus shifts to the queen’s other female cousins: Margaret, countess of Lennox and her granddaughter Arbella Stuart, who were descended from Henry VIII’s elder sister Margaret; and Margaret, Countess of Derby, and Lady Jane Grey’s younger sisters Katherine and Mary, all from the line of Henry’s younger sister Mary. Every one of these women got into trouble with Elizabeth and spent time in the Tower or under house arrest. Were they victims of the queen’s jealousy and spite, or simply too close to the throne for comfort?

Susan Doran is Professor of Early Modern British History at the University of Oxford and Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College and St Benet’s Hall, Oxford. She has written numerous books, including Mary Queen of Scots, An Illustrated Life and Elizabeth I and Her Circle. She has edited a number of exhibition catalogues for the British Library including the one accompanying the exhibition, Elizabeth and Mary: Royal Cousin, Rival Queens.’

From British Library

For further details and to buy tickets – British Library.



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‘Famous Last Words’ by Chris Woods added to the website…


(c) Pen and Sword History


‘Famous Last Words: Confessions, Humour and Bravery of the Departing’ by Chris Wood added to the General Works section of the bibliography.

Entries added to the following:

Art – Paintings – Delaroche

Writings of Lady Jane Grey – Letters – Speech from Scaffold.



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9 Day Giveaway – Day 8 – Win ‘Lady Jane Grey: A Tudor Mystery’ by Eric Ives


To celebrate 20 years of my website, I am running a 9 Day Giveaway on key dates throughout the year that relate to Lady Jane.

7th September 1548 – Jane is chief mourner at the funeral of Dowager Queen Katherine Parr at Sudeley Castle


On day 8 of the giveaway you have a chance to win a paperback copy of, ‘Lady Jane Grey: A Tudor Mystery’ by Eirc Ives in a world-wide giveaway!



‘Lady Jane Grey, is one of the most elusive and tragic characters in English history.

In July 1553 the death of the childless Edward VI threw the Tudor dynasty into crisis. On Edward’s instructions his cousin Jane Grey was proclaimed queen, only to be ousted 13 days later by his illegitimate half sister Mary and later beheaded. In this radical reassessment, Eric Ives rejects traditional portraits of Jane both as hapless victim of political intrigue or Protestant martyr. Instead he presents her as an accomplished young woman with a fierce personal integrity. The result is a compelling dissection by a master historian and storyteller of one of history’s most shocking injustices.’

From Amazon.co.uk


To enter the competition

Email me at Ljgcompetition at yahoo.co.uk. Replace ‘at’ with @. Put Day 8 in the Subject line.

The competition ends at midnight (UK time) on Tuesday 21st September.

The winner will be selected at random.

Good luck!



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