Les Tudors: I’exposition – Musee du Luxembourg


(c) Musee du Luxembourg

(c) Musee du Luxembourg


On Friday I visited the National Portrait Gallery and found that many of the most well known Tudor paintings are not on display. They have gone to Paris for ‘Les Tudors’ exhibition at the Musee du Luxembourg from 18 March until 19 July 2015.

One of the paintings included in the exhibition is the ‘Master John’ portrait of Queen Catherine Parr (once thought to be of Lady Jane Grey).


(c) Musee du Luxemboug

(c) Musee du Luxemboug


@manx_maid has posted a link to videos about the exhibition.

Musee du Luxembourg – Videos


You can read more about the exhibition and buy tickets from:



Les Tudors

Tickets

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A glimpse of the Lady Jane Streatham portrait behind the scenes at the National Portrait Gallery…


(c) NPG

The portrait will be on display at Montacute House in Somerset from late spring.


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Books 2015 – on sale now – Elizabeth I and Her Circle by Susan Doran


March – Elizabeth I and Her Circle by Susan Doran


 (c) OUP Oxford

(c) OUP Oxford


‘This is the inside story of Elizabeth I’s inner circle and the crucial human relationships which lay at the heart of her personal and political life. Using a wide range of original sources – including private letters, portraits, verse, drama, and state papers – Susan Doran provides a vivid and often dramatic account of political life in Elizabethan England and the queen at its centre, offering a deeper insight into Elizabeth’s emotional and political conduct – and challenging many of the popular myths that have grown up around her.

It is a story replete with fascinating questions. What was the true nature of Elizabeth’s relationship with her father, Henry VIII, especially after his execution of her mother? What was the influence of her step-mothers on Elizabeth’s education and religious beliefs? How close was she really to her half-brother Edward VI – and were relations with her half-sister Mary really as poisonous as is popularly assumed? And what of her relationship with her Stewart cousins, most famously with Mary Queen of Scots, executed on Elizabeth’s orders in 1587, but also with Mary’s son James VI of Scotland, later to succeed Elizabeth as her chosen successor?

Elizabeth’s relations with her family were crucial, but almost as crucial were her relations with her courtiers and her councillors (her ‘men of business’). Here again, the story unravels a host of fascinating questions. Was the queen really sexually jealous of her maids of honour? What does her long and intimate relationship with the Earl of Leicester reveal about her character, personality, and attitude to marriage? What can the fall of Essex tell us about Elizabeth’s political management in the final years of her reign? And what was the true nature of her personal and political relationship with influential and long-serving councillors such as the Cecils and Sir Francis Walsingham?

From – Amazon.co.uk

Further details – Amazon.co.uk


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Two new books to look out for in 2015 and 2016…


15 August 2015 – Margaret Pole: The Countess in the Tower by Susan Higginbotham

‘Of the many executions ordered by Henry VIII, surely the most horrifying was that of sixty-seven-year-old Margaret Pole, Countess of Salisbury, hacked to pieces on the scaffold by a blundering headsman. From the start, Margaret’s life had been marred by tragedy and violence: her father, George, Duke of Clarence, had been executed at the order of his own brother, Edward IV, and her naive young brother, Edward, Earl of Warwick, had spent most of his life in the Tower before being executed on the orders of Henry VII. Yet Margaret, friend to Catherine of Aragon and the beloved governess of her daughter Mary, had seemed destined for a happier fate, until religious upheaval and rebellion caused Margaret and her family to fall from grace. From Margaret’s birth as the daughter of a royal duke to her beatification centuries after her death, Margaret Pole: The Countess in the Tower tells the story of one of the fortress’s most unlikely prisoners.’

From Amazon.co.uk

Further details – Amazon.co.uk



11 February 2016 – Richard III: Brother, Protector, King by Chris Skidmore

‘The last Plantagenet king remains one of England’s most famous and controversial monarchs. There are few parallels in English history that can match the drama of Richard III’s reign, witnessed in its full bloody intensity.
A dedicated brother and loyal stalwart to the Yorkist dynasty for most of his early life, Richard’s personality was forged in the tribulation of exile and the brutality of combat. An ambitious nobleman and successful general with a loyal following, Richard was a man who could claim to have achieved every ambition in life, except one.

Within months of his brother Edward IV’s early death, Richard stunned the nation when he seized the throne for himself and disinherited his nephews. Having put to death his rivals, Richard’s two-year reign would become one of the most tumultuous in English history, ending in treachery and with his death on the battlefield at Bosworth.

Chris Skidmore’s biography strips back the legends that surround Richard’s life and reign, and by returning to original manuscript evidence, he rediscovers the man as contemporaries saw him. Rather than vindicate or condemn, Skidmore’s compelling study presents every facet of Richard’s personality as it deserves to be seen: as one of the most important figures in medieval history, whose actions and behaviour underline the true nature of power in an age of great drama, upheaval and instability.’

From Amazon.co.uk

Further details – Amazon.co.uk


Posted in Books 2015, Books 2016, Susan Higginbotham | Comments Off

Books 2015 – on sale now – The Family of Richard III by Michael Hicks


15 March – The Family of Richard III by Michael Hicks


 (c) Amberley Publishing

(c) Amberley Publishing


‘The Wars of the Roses were quarrels within the Plantagenet family, of which Richard’s dynasty, the house of York was one branch. The house of York won the first war, with Richard’s elder brother becoming king as Edward IV. In 1483, after decades of family infighting, there was a sudden violent resolution following Edward IV’s death. Richard III claimed to be his brother’s heir, the Yorkist establishment refused and shared in Richard’s destruction. With the recent discovery of Richard III’s skeleton and his reburial in Leicester Cathedral, Professor Michael Hicks, described by BBC HISTORY MAGAZINE as ‘the greatest living expert on Richard III’ reassesses the family ties and entrails of his wayward and violent family. Many thousands of descendants of Richard survive, some more interested in their linage than others, and the book will conclude with an analysis of Richard’s DNA and his ‘family’ as it exists today.’

From – Amazon.co.uk


Further details – Amazon.co.uk


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Books 2015 – on sale now – Inside The Tudor Court (paperback) by Lauren Mackay


15 March – Inside the Tudor Court: Henry VIII and his Six Wives through the eyes of the Spanish Ambassador (Paperback) by Lauren Mackay



 (c) Amberley  Publishing

(c) Amberley Publishing


‘The reports and despatches of Eustace Chapuys, Spanish Ambassador to Henry VIII’s court from 1529 to 1545, have been instrumental in shaping our modern interpretations of Henry VIII and his wives. As a result of his personal relationships with several of Henry’s queens, and Henry himself, his writings were filled with colourful anecdotes, salacious gossip, and personal and insightful observations of the key players at court, thus offering the single most continuous portrait of the central decades of Henry’s reign. Beginning with Chapuys’ arrival in England, in the middle of Henry VIII’s divorce from Katherine of Aragon, this book progresses through the episodic reigns of each of Henry’s queens. Chapuys tirelessly defended Katherine and later her daughter, Mary Tudor, the future Mary I. He remained as ambassador through the rise and fall of Anne Boleyn, and reported on each and every one of Henry’s subsequent wives – Jane Seymour, Anne of Cleves, Catherine Howard, and Katharine Parr – as well as that most notorious of ministers Thomas Cromwell. He retired in 1545, close to the end of Henry VIII’s reign. In approaching the period through Chapuys’ letters, Lauren Mackay provides a fresh perspective on Henry, his court and the Tudor period in general.’

From Amazon.co.uk


Further details – Lauren Mackay

Further details – Amazon.co.uk


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Books 2015 – on sale now- Henry VIII’s Last Love: The Extraordinary Life of Katherine Willoughby, Lady-in-Waiting to the Tudors by David Baldwin


March – Henry VIII’s Last Love: The Extraordinary Life of Katherine Willoughby, Lady in Waiting to the Tudors by David Baldwin


(c) Amberley Publishing

(c) Amberley Publishing


‘In 1533 Katherine Willoughby married Charles Brandon, Henry VIII’s closest friend. She would go on to serve at the court of every Tudor monarch bar Henry VII and Mary Tudor. Duchess of Suffolk at the age of fourteen, she became a powerful woman ruling over her houses at Grimsthorpe and Tattershall in Lincolnshire and wielding subtle influence through her proximity to the king. She grew to know Henry well and in 1538, only three months after Jane Seymour’s death, it was reported that they had been ‘masking and visiting’ together. In 1543 she became a lady-in-waiting to his sixth wife Catherine Parr. Henry had a reputation for tiring of his wives once the excitement of the pursuit was over, and in February 1546, only six months after Charles Brandon’s death, it was rumoured that Henry intended to wed Katherine himself if he could end his present marriage. This is the remarkable story of a life of privilege, tragedy and danger, of a woman who so nearly became the seventh wife of Henry VIII.’

From – Amazon.co.uk


Further details – Amazon.co.uk


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Books 2015 – on sale today – God’s Traitors by Jessie Childs (paperback)


5 March – God’s Traitors: Terror and Faith in Elizabethan England (paperback) by Jessie Childs


 (c) Vintage

(c) Vintage


‘The Catholics of Elizabethan England did not witness a golden age. Their Mass was banned, their priests were outlawed, their faith was criminalised. In an age of assassination and Armada, those Catholics who clung to their faith were increasingly seen as the enemy within. In this superb history, award-winning author Jessie Childs explores the Catholic predicament in Elizabethan England through the eyes of one remarkable family: the Vauxes of Harrowden Hall.

God’s Traitors is a tale of dawn raids and daring escapes, stately homes and torture chambers, ciphers, secrets and lies. From clandestine chapels and side-street inns to exile communities and the corridors of power, it exposes the tensions and insecurities masked by the cult of Gloriana. Above all, it is a timely story of courage and frailty, repression and reaction and the terrible consequences when religion and politics collide.’

From Amazon.co.uk

Further details – Jessie Childs

Further details – Amazon.co.uk

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Helen Castor discusses Joan of Arc


Historian Helen Castor discusses her new book, ‘Joan of Arc: A History’ on ABC Radio.


Conversations with Richard Fidler – Helen Castor


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Lady Jane mentioned in BBC History Magazine article


Lady Jane is briefly mentioned in an article in the March 2015 issue of BBC History Magazine.


(c) BBC History Magazine

(c) BBC History Magazine


David Baldwin’s article, ‘A Seventh Wife for Henry VIII?’ looks at the possibility that Henry VIII might have considered a seventh marriage to Katherine Willoughby. Katherine was Lady Jane’s step-grandmother and the article mentions Jane in relation to the events of her nine day’s reign.

David Baldwin’s new book, ‘Henry VIII’s Last Love: The Extraordinary Life of Katherine Willoughby, Lady-in-Waiting to the Tudors’ is published on 15th March.


(c) Amberley Publishing

(c) Amberley Publishing


Posted in Books 2015, David Baldwin | Comments Off