Books 2018 – on sale today – Queens of the Conquest: England’s Medieval Queens (Paperback) by Alison Weir


(c) Vintage


‘Love, murder, war, betrayal

This is the story of the five extraordinary queens who helped the Norman kings of England rule their dominions. Recognised as equal sharers in the royal authority, their story is packed with tragedy, high drama, even comedy.

Heroines, villains, stateswomen, lovers

Beginning with Matilda of Flanders, who supported William the Conqueror in his invasion of England in 1066, and culminating in the turbulent life of the Empress Maud, whoc claimed to be queen of England in her own right and fought a bitter war to the end, the five Norman queens are revealed as hugely influential figures and fascinating characters.

In Alison Weir’s hands, these pioneering women reclaim their rightful roles at the centre of English history.’

From Amazon.co.uk

Further details – Amazon.co.uk



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29th August 1553 – The author of ‘The Chronicle of Queen Jane’ dines with Lady Jane.


On 29th August 1553, the author of ‘The Chronicle of Queen Jane etc’ dined with Lady Jane and recorded the details of their conversation.


Site of Nathaniel Partridge’s House


Events by Place – Tower of London



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Britian’s Great Cathedrals – Salisbury


(c) Channel 5


‘Britain’s Great Cathedrals’ is a Channel 5 series presented by Tony Robinson. The third programme looked at Salisbury Cathedral, which is the final resting place of Lady Katherine Grey.


(c) Channel 5


‘One royal never escaped Salisbury Cathedral, she is still here 400 years later, lying next to her husband. Players in a tragic love story.

A lot of people will have heard of Lady Jane Grey, who was Queen of England for just nine days but not so many will have heard of her sister Katherine, who is buried here and who’s story is just as remarkable.


(c) Channel 5


Katherine was first in line to the throne on 3 separate occasions. Although unlike her ill-fated sister, she was never crowned. But the story of the two sisters reveals so much about the intrigues that took place in the Tudor court.


(c) Channel 5


Katherine first became heir to the throne when her teenage sister Jane was made Queen in 1553. But Jane was quickly ousted by Mary I, daughter of King Henry VIII, who imprisoned her in the Tower and then ordered her execution.


(c) Channel 5


Although she was known as ‘Bloody Mary’ she may have had a softer side because she seems to have taken to Jane’s sister, Katherine and because she had no children of her own, considered Katherine to be next in line for the throne, for the second time.

But once again, it wasn’t to be. Bloody Mary died at the age of 42 and on her death bed, she recognised her half-sister Elizabeth, as the rightful heir to the throne.

Elizabeth remained unmarried and childless throughout her reign. So the question was, who would succeed her on her death?

Elizabeth looked to her younger cousin, who happened to be Lady Katherine Grey. So, for the third time Katherine was considered heir to the throne.


(c) Channel 5


But then everything changed, Katherine fell in love with a noble called Edward Seymour. She became pregnant and they married in secret.


(c) Channel 5


When Elizabeth found out, she flew into a rage, accusing Katherine of marrying without her consent. She banished Edward overseas and ordered Katherine to be locked in the Tower, where she gave birth to a son.


(c) Channel 5


Edward later returned to England and was also imprisoned in the Tower. Despite being behind bars, the couple managed to reunite and Katherine soon fell pregnant again. When Queen Elizabeth heard the news, she was angrier than ever.

After annulling the marriage, which meant that neither of the children could ever lay claim to the throne, she ordered Edward never to see Lady Katherine ever again.


(c) Channel 5


Although released from the Tower, Katherine was placed under house arrest. She never saw Edward again and died five years later, aged just 27. Officially she died from TB but many believe it was from a broken heart.

Her body was brought to Salisbury Cathedral to lie alongside her husband.

Here, Katherine was reunited with Edward. The love of her life, the man she had sacrificed everything for. Her body lies slightly higher than his in recognition of her royal status.’


(c) Channel 5




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21 August 1553…


The Chronicle of Queen Jane and of Two Years of Queen Mary, and Especially of the Rebellion of Sir Thomas Wyat

p.19

’Note, on mondaye the xxjst of August, it was appointed the duke with other shoulde have suffered, and all the garde were at the Tower; but howe soever it chaunced he did not; but he desired to here masse, and to receave the sacrament, according to the olde accustomed maner. So about ix of the clocke the alter in the chappell was arrayed, and eche thing prepared for the purpose; then mr Gage went and fetched the duke; and sir John Abridges and mr. John Abridges dyd fetche the marques of Northampton, sir Androwe Dudley, sir Herry Gates and sir Thomas Plamer, to masse…The lady Jane loking through the windowe sawe the duke and the rest going to the churche.’

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Books 2018 – on sale now – Queenship and Counsel in Early Modern Europe edited by Helen Matheson-Pollock, Joanne Paul and Catherine Fletcher


(c) Palgrave Macmillan


‘The discourse of political counsel in early modern Europe depended on the participation of men, as both counsellors and counselled. Women were often thought too irrational or imprudent to give or receive political advice―but they did in unprecedented numbers, as this volume shows. These essays trace the relationship between queenship and counsel through over three hundred years of history. Case studies span Europe, from Sweden and Poland-Lithuania via the Habsburg territories to England and France, and feature queens regnant, consort and regent, including Elizabeth I of England, Catherine Jagiellon of Sweden, Catherine de’ Medici and Anna of Denmark. They draw on a variety of innovative sources to recover evidence of queenly counsel, from treatises and letters to poetry, masques and architecture. For scholars of history, politics and literature in early modern Europe, this book enriches our understanding of royal women as political actors.’

From Amazon.co.uk

Further details – Palgrave Queenship and Power

Further details – Amazon.co.uk



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